Parveen Dusanj – Bedi & Suki Dusanj launches Fair Trade India Week to promote fair and transparent trade of fashion.

Mumbai, November 21, 2016,  This day marked the opening of Fair Trade India week,  where Fashion Revolution organised hangout events pan-India introducing True Cost of fashion and the impact our textiles industry have on people and the planet. Multiple screenings in Mumbai, Bangalore & Chennai will screen the True Cost Fashion documentary by Andrew Morgan in a bid to inform consumers, retailers, manufacturers and the government about change that needs to happen for a more transparent, fair and sustainable industry.

“Fair Trade India’s theme this year is ‘The Power of You’ so as Head of Fashion Revolution India it is my duty to use the power of me to discuss the power of India. India is the second largest producer of silk in the world and the third largest producer of cotton. We have a massive influence on the world and its environment when it comes to the garment industry but India is paying the price for it. Why is Kanpur (dubbed as the leather manufacturing capital of the world) drenched in Chromium 6? If anybody watched Erin Brockovich they will know the scandal that the oscar nominated movie was based on – a case in California where the company Pacific Gas and Electric were sued for contaminating the drinking water in the town of Hinkley with Chromium 6, they were awarded 333 million dollars as settlement, guess where  the same deadly chemical is currently being used… Right here on our land in Kanpur, India to make leather and then it is washed up on the shores of our rivers and penetrated into our land and into the water systems where disease, disability and infertility is rife. I ask the question – do Indian lives matter less? What about our people? I believe that at some point there will be a tipping point and retail brands will have to build better supply chains and relationships with their manufacturers. Although I am British born and live in Switzerland I spend a lot of time in India and I have spent years working in India. I am inherently Punjabi and come from farming roots. I have a social responsibility to use my collective power as a force for good. I care about the farmer, I care about the environment and more to the point I really do want to know who made my clothes. I support fair and transparent fashion.” Suki Dusanj – Lenz, Head of Fashion Revolution India

The Fashion Revolution has already begun, we have more sustainable brands setting up shop and we have gaged a massive global imprint digitally asking consumers & brands to show their label and ask Who Made My Clothes? We are now in 92 different countries.

Every year the talented sister duo, holds a Fashion Revolution week starting on the 24th April to honour those that died during the Rana Plaza disaster. However Fashion Revolution runs all year round, raising awareness of the fashion industry’s most pressing issues, showing that change is possible and celebrating those who are on a journey to create a more ethical and sustainable future for fashion.  

Gracing the event to show their support and solidarity were Kabir Bedi, Aftab Shivdasani, Nin Dusanj, Nidhi Subbiah, Noi Ceclia oldne

 

Quick facts – 

India is one of the worlds largest producers of textiles and clothes with many global brands producing their garments in India due to the competitive price points and cheap labour costs. The textiles industry is the second largest polluter in the world. The first is oil.

Impact

In 2016 70,000 people asked brands WHO MADE MY CLOTHES on social media with a 129 million reach of #FashRev hashtags which is double the 2015 figures.aftab-shivdasni-nin-dusanj-suki-dusanj-parveen-dusanj-and-kabir-bedi

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